Pool of Possibilities - Courtney Milne

Courtney Milne was a world renown Canadian photographer. He produced numerous books and exhibitions with images gathered from around the world.

Over 45,000 images became The Pool of Possibilities e-calendar, a 365 calendar with Courtney's narratives titled Poolside Wisdom. Courtney's wife, Sherrill Miller, gifted Courtney's collection to the university of Saskatchewan's Library Archives & Special Collections. Te e-calendar is now available agin along with the opportunity to purchase copies of Courtney's images.

The images are full of beautiful colours, shapes and abstracts along with Courtney's narratives, inviting each of us to explore and become one with Nature's rhythms. Clicking on this link will take you directly to the reasoning behind the images.

If you subscribe to the e-calendar, each day you will receive:

  • a new image of the pool
  • a unique title for each day, inspired by the rhythms of Nature
  • Courtney's "Poolside Wisdom", the story behind each photo

Pool of Wisdom example:

 A beam of sunlight shone down on the pool today and my spirit immediately soared. Light rays can so easily elevate the energy of a place, bringing warmth to a bleak atmosphere and brightness to a mournful setting. A beam also conveys direction and focus, which in turn can suggest a sense of guidance. I immediately look to see what the ray is pointing to, wondering what I am meant to see, to know, to discover.  The sunbeam does not tell us what we need to know, but it can help us to access our inner direction. Sometimes asking the beam to point the way can help me to see more clearly what might have been there all the time, but is not immediately evident.  What guidance might be waiting for you, but just needs to be seen in the right light? Can you access the light within that might be the needed guidance for others?     Courtney Milne fonds, image 17-0805.1

A beam of sunlight shone down on the pool today and my spirit immediately soared. Light rays can so easily elevate the energy of a place, bringing warmth to a bleak atmosphere and brightness to a mournful setting. A beam also conveys direction and focus, which in turn can suggest a sense of guidance. I immediately look to see what the ray is pointing to, wondering what I am meant to see, to know, to discover.

The sunbeam does not tell us what we need to know, but it can help us to access our inner direction. Sometimes asking the beam to point the way can help me to see more clearly what might have been there all the time, but is not immediately evident.

What guidance might be waiting for you, but just needs to be seen in the right light? Can you access the light within that might be the needed guidance for others?

 

Courtney Milne fonds, image 17-0805.1